Category Archives: Notes from a gig

GUEST POST: Riding the wave with Catherine Brophy

‘Set in the years of the Celtic Tiger, Burning Bright is told in the voices of Kerrigan family members and friends. It’s funny. It’s believable. And it will definitely make you laugh.’

This week’s guest post comes courtesy of Catherine Brophy, a storyteller, broadcaster and author.  Her new book burning bright is available through Amazon both in kindle and paperback.  Here she talks all about different ways of coping with speaking in front of a crowd and gives us all a few pointers

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FOR NIAMH

RIDING THE WAVE.

They say that the two greatest fears are:

1. Death

2. Speaking in public!

Wow.   Speaking in public is almost as scary as death!

I LOVE speaking in public.   I love standing up telling stories, giving a talk or giving a workshop.  I love the moment when all the eyes are looking and I know I have them in the palm of my hand.

It’s to do with a certain kind of power.   But hey…not in a Neuremburg rally kind of way!   It’s about the power of two-way communication.   Not just me telling you and you listening, but about you telling me something back and me listening as well.   Here let me explain.

There are three ways to respond to an audience.

THE FIRST

Eeeeeeeeeeeeekkkk !!!!!

They’re all looking at me!   What’ll they think of me?   They’ll think I’m stupid.  I’ll make a fool of myself.   I’ll get mixed up.   I’ll forget what I want to say.

So you get up, you do all the things you predicted.   You stumble, you forget, you make a fool of yourself, you embarrass the audience and afterwards you feel terrible and you swear that you’llnever do it again.   Either that or you run away and afterwards feel terrible and wish you had the courage to do it.

Rating: 0 stars!

THE SECOND

Create a mental glass wall.

Someone advises you to imagine them all naked.   But, when you’re standing up there, that’s difficult. So you take a deep breath and mentally cut yourself off.   Then you deliver your words.

This works reasonably well.   You get through your speech.  You don’t make a fool of yourself.  Afterwards you feel relieved and pleased that at least you did it. But the communication is only one way.  Because of the invisible wall, you were unaware of the audience response.   Ever sit through a talk/ lecture/ performance where you’re stifling the yawns and wishing they’d stop waffling and just hurry up and finish?   That’s someone who’s created an invisible wall.

Rating: 2 stars **

THE THIRD

Ride the Wave.

Anyone who has ever stood in front of an audience knows that you can feel something from them. Some kind of energy.   And that every audience feels different.  But every audience has one thing in common, a positive hope.   Please be good, they’re hoping, entertain me, inform me, interest me, make me laugh, make me cry, horrify me, thrill me, excite me.  Nobody gets themselves ready and leaves the comfort of home in the hope of being bored!  This means that:

Every audience is on your side.   Yieeeeeeeeeeha!

Every audience is willing you to be fabulous. Yabbadabbadoo! That’s what you feel when you stand up in front of them.   A wave of positive hope, of them willing you to be wonderful.

But then there’s the stuff going on in your body.  The huge cloud of butterflies fluttering about in your stomach.

Butterflies are the physical expression of adrenalin.

Adrenalin is the chemical that pumps you up to perform.

Butterflies love oxygen.   It helps them to fly in formation.    Take a couple of deep breaths.

But then there’s stuff going on in your head.  Will I remember?  Is it okay?  Assuming you know your stuff and that you’ve prepared – yes it will be fine.  Stand securely, feet shoulder width apart, relax your shoulders. Look at the audience. Yes look straight at them.   See all those shining eyes?   They love you already.    Breathe in that wave of positive energy and ride, baby ride.

Then something magical happens.  Suddenly you find that you can improvise, make off the cuff comments, make  jokes. And if you stumble over a word, forget something or make a mistake you have the confidence to laugh at yourself and instead of thinking you’re an eejit the audience loves you for being human. But most important of all, when you ride that wave, you become hyper-sensitive to the audience reaction.   You know when something is working and you know when to cut something off.   You now have information that will feed your next performance and make it even better.

Riding the wave means that you have to open yourself to your audience.   The first time you do it takes courage but the rewards are so great that next time it’s going to be a doddle!

Rating: 5 stars *****

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Catherine Brophy’s ‘Burning Bright’ can be found on Amazon here–  for kindle and here–    for Paperback.

Ps-you may have noticed a lack of updates lately here.  This is due to builders in my house and upcoming college exams. Because of the fact that I don’t have a roof, desk or any time to spare, Bank Holiday Tuesday will be taking a brief hiatus- See y’all next month! xx

Niamh ‘I’m just stepping out and may be some time’ Keoghan

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Beiber Fever

Column originally published on the StudentStandard.ie

About Beiber

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Just this afternoon on her train, Bank Holiday Tuesday (BHT) noticed many “tweenage” girls in short shorts and brightly coloured baseball caps. I wondered if I had in fact fallen through a wormhole to 1993.  No, these were just the final stragglers returning from staking out the Merrion Hotel where Justin Bieber was staying.  Oh Bieber fever.  When I was a girl it was Spice World and Boyzone – we were big into pandering the gender binary to little girls in my day and viewed the new wave of co-ed pop groups with suspicion. Liberty X and Hearsay and all that MIXING of the SEXES! It was too much for my little 9 year old head.  Now we’re back to the nice binary system of boys in one group, girls in another.  Now some don’t even NEED band mates: we have Taylor Swift and Justin Bieber to aspire to.

I drove past the point depot with my Ma last night and marveled at all the cars parked around- way more than you’d usually see waiting after a gig.  When I heard it was Bieber I realised this must be an army of mums and dads waiting anxiously to pick up their darlings from the concert, possibly chaperoned by cool older sisters or younger aunties.  There is something strangely cult like about Bieber.  I think his hair has nanobots in it, controlling the little girls via electron pulses.  That is the only way I can justify his alarmingly hysterical popularity.  Maybe he’s a cult leader. I think Anonymous needs to get onto him, to be honest.  He could be sacrificing virgins to Xenu for all we know.

But seriously, let us all be fair.  Bieber is pretty easily avoidable in music fan terms. He doesn’t get that much radio play and he’s not on the music channels (yes this is how BHT experiences her music because it is still 2003 in her head…) and the level of hate he produces online is about equal to that of Osama bin Laden.  People haaaaate this kid.  BHT is not sure why.  As far as pop crooners pandering to little girls go, he’s certainly not the worst.  Often I hear people complaining that kids are listening to shit music these days.  Eh, yeah, because that’s what kids do.  You have to go through a stage where you listen to total twaddle before you catch five seconds of, say, Joni Mitchell’s Blue played by your mother at 3AM on a Sunday and you understand.

We need shitty pop music slopped out by the mainstream labels: if we didn’t  we would have no way of obscuring our gems so they don’t get sucked in by the mainstream.  Let the little girls work themselves into a state of weeping hysteria. Let them get it out of their systems now in one fearsome  dose of fever: the Bieber fever.  Bad music is, to BHT, a rite of passage we must all take.  We don’t all have parents with extensive Rory Gallagher back catalogues or Uncles who lend you Talking heads ‘77 to help you in your education- some of us curate our tastes slowly, through accumulation.  The first Album BHT owned was Avril Lavigne and a best  of Britney Spears.  Let those without sin cast the first hip hop style diss.  Besides, little girls have always listened to inane crap. It’s how Donny Osmond and John Travolta made careers.  There is NO POINT trying to play Ani DiFranco to your 3 year old cousin (BHT has tried).

So let it be said now: BHT is defending Bieber.  She is defending Bieber because all little girls have to have their shitty music quota filled, so that when they are 24 and sipping ironic PBR at a party in a squat on Camden street wearing one of those absurd furry animal hats, she must still pause before passing judgement on another person’s music taste.  It is an  anchoring anti hipster force in the world, for no matter how hip and cool any of us will ever be,

There will always be a Bieber Fever scar on our heart.

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Niamh ‘I’m about to lose my mind up in hurrr’ Keoghan

Notes from a gig: The Red Hot Chili Peppers

I’ve wanted to see the Chili peppers for a while, seeing as they’re pretty much the background noise that coloured my childhood and adolesence.  They’ve been around and rocking for my entire life and so I do think my  generation has a particular fondness for them.  So I managed to snag a last minute ticket and went along, and I was pleasantly surprised to find them as amazing as ever- My experience of live Chilis is a DVD of their legendary 2003 Slane gig, so my expectations were high.  Boy they put on a good show…

It didn’t rain which also gives us many happy points

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